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Physician of the Year: Acute Care Surgery

Posted on Mon, Apr 13, 2015
Physician of the Year: Acute Care Surgery

 
2015 Acute Award Presented to Orange Park Surgeon
EmCare Honors Dr. Alexander Rose with National Recognition

 
ORLANDO, FLA. (April 7, 2015) – The medical director of surgery at Orange Park Medical Center in Orange Park, Fla., Alexander Rose, M.D., has been honored with the prestigious Acute Award for 2015. The award is presented by EmCare, a leading national provider of physician practice management services, and honors a single surgeon for the award each year.

 “It’s a tremendous honor,” said Dr. Rose of receiving the award. “These recognitions aren’t singular things. My wife, my staff, the administration at Orange Park and the staff at EmCare have been really created an environment where surgeons can thrive.”

“Dr. Rose is a great surgeon and a wonderful leader,” said John Josephs, M.D., CEO of EmCare Acute Care Surgery. “His work with robotic surgery has been innovative, and his collaboration with peers in helping to increase robotic surgery at his hospital has really been pioneering.”

Dr. Rose has been very involved in training and growing the types of robotic surgeries available at Orange Park Medical Center. The hospital’s administration praises his surgical skills, leadership skills and patient care. The hospital’s CEO, Chad Patrick, even drove from Charleston, S.C. to Orange Park while suffering from appendicitis so that Dr. Rose could personally perform the appendectomy.

Dr. Rose was honored with the Acute Award during EmCare’s annual Leadership Conference. The 2015 convention was held at the Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando, Fla. While the Acute Award recognizes a single surgeon from across the United States, EmCare also annually honors individuals from emergency medicine, hospital medicine and anesthesiology as its Physicians of the Year

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AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

Posted on Sun, Jan 18, 2015
AMA Reports on How Docs Use Their Free Time

Doctors of all ages report being physically active, with many running or jogging, walking for health

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association recently surveyed physicians to find what activities they pursue when not in the exam room.

According to the results of the survey, physicians of all ages report being physically active, with the most-enjoyed activity for physicians under age 40 being running or jogging (about one-half of physicians of this age run or jog). Physicians aged 40 to 59 report that they most enjoy running or jogging (36 percent), bicycling (35 percent), and camping or hiking (24 percent). About 50 percent of physicians older than 60 reported walking to stay healthy. Other interests include golf, aerobics and cardio, skiing, tennis, and fishing.

Other leisure activities reported include reading, with many physicians describing themselves as avid readers; regular reading was reported by more than half of physicians under 40, 58 percent of those aged 40 to 59, and more than 64 percent of those aged 60 and older. Gardening, do-it-yourself home improvement and decorating, and playing musical instruments were also reported as top hobbies, while nearly half of all physicians are interested in gourmet cooking. More than one-quarter of physicians are interested in new technology, and a similar percentage own a Kindle e-book reader.

"Free time isn't something most doctors have in abundance," according to the report. "But when they're not working, physicians of all ages engage in a variety of extracurricular activities."

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Too Much Patient Care Tied to Faculty Members' Intent to Leave

Posted on Sat, Dec 13, 2014
Too Much Patient Care Tied to Faculty Members' Intent to Leave

Intent to leave higher for those who say they spend 'far too much/too much' time/effort on patient care

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Spending "far too much/too much" time/effort on patient care is associated with increased intent to leave the institution, according to research published in Academic Medicine.

Susan M. Pollart, M.D., from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and colleagues surveyed faculty from 14 U.S. medical schools in the 2011 to 2012 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. The correlations between clinical faculty members' self-reported time/effort in each mission area, assessment of time/effort, and intent to leave the institution and academic medicine were assessed. Responses were obtained from 8,349 clinical faculty members.

The researchers found that respondents reported 54.5 percent time/effort in patient care, on average. Time/effort in patient care was not found to be associated with intent to leave one's institution. The likelihood of leaving one's institution was found to be increased for respondents who described spending "far too much/too much" time in patient care (odds ratio, 2.12). Compared with those who reported spending "far too little/too little" or "far too much/too much" time/effort in one or more mission areas, those who assessed their time/effort in all mission areas as "about right" were less likely to report intent to leave their institution (5.6 versus 14.6 percent).

"Efforts to align time/effort spent in each mission area with faculty expectations may improve retention," the authors write.

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Triple Aim Should Be Expanded to Address Physician Burnout

Posted on Sun, Dec 07, 2014
Triple Aim Should Be Expanded to Address Physician Burnout

Provider burnout linked to lower patient satisfaction, reduced health outcomes; may increase costs

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding the Triple Aim approach -- which includes enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs -- to the Quadruple Aim by adding the goal of improving health care provider work life is recommended, according to the authors of an article published in the November/December issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Thomas Bodenheimer, M.D., from the University of California at San Francisco, and Christine Sinsky, M.D., from Medical Associates Clinic and Health Plan in Dubuque, Iowa, discuss the impact of burnout and dissatisfaction in relation to the Triple Aim.

Noting that burnout correlates with lower patient satisfaction and reduced health outcomes, and may increase costs thereby imperiling the Triple Aim, the researchers discuss expansion to a Quadruple Aim, adding the goal of improving health care provider work life. Increased burnout has been seen in practices working towards Triple Aim performance. Addressing clinician satisfaction has been associated with improvement in Triple Aim measures.

"The positive engagement, rather than the negative frustration, of the health care workforce is of paramount importance in achieving the primary goal of the Triple Aim -- improving population health," the authors write. "Leaders and providers of health care should consider adding a fourth dimension -- improving the work life of those who deliver care -- to the compass points of better care, better health, and lower costs."

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Want to Be a Leader? Cultivate a Healthy Look

Posted on Mon, Dec 01, 2014
Want to Be a Leader? Cultivate a Healthy Look

The appearance of fitness trumps a look of intelligence, researchers say

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's more important for potential business or political leaders to look healthy than intelligent, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

The study included 148 adults who were shown a series of two photos of men's faces and asked to pick which one they would choose as new chief executive officers (CEOs) for companies. When selecting between each pair of photos, the CEOs' main challenge was described to the participants. Each pair of photos actually featured the same man, but his face had been digitally altered to look more or less intelligent or more or less healthy.

The researchers found that, overall, participants chose more healthy-looking faces over more intelligent-looking faces 69 percent of the time. More intelligent faces were preferred only when the participants were told the CEO would have to negotiate between groups or find new markets.

"Here we show that it always pays for aspiring leaders to look healthy, which explains why politicians and executives often put great effort, time and money in their appearance," study lead author Brian Spisak, Ph.D., assistant professor at the department of management and organization at VU University Amsterdam, said in a journal news release. "If you want to be chosen for a leadership position, looking intelligent is an optional extra under context-specific situations, whereas the appearance of health appears to be important in a more context-general way across a variety of situations."

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