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Geographic Location Most Important for Residents

Posted on Sat, Jun 13, 2015
Geographic Location Most Important for Residents

Lifestyle, adequate call hours and personal time, good financial package also important

WEDNESDAY, June 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For residents, the most important element in a future practice is geographic location, with lifestyle, adequate call hours and personal time, and a good financial package also cited as being important, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

As part of a national survey, more than 1,000 residents answered questions relating to what they want in a future practice. A total of 24,000 residents were sent the Meritt Hawkins survey by e-mail, and 1,208 responses were received (5 percent). Residents ranked nine elements in order of importance.

According to the respondents, the most important element in a future practice is geographic location (69 percent), followed by lifestyle (61 percent), and adequate call hours and personal time (60 percent). A good financial package was important for 58 percent of respondents, while 48 percent wanted proximity to family and good medical facilities/equipment. Specialty support, educational loan forgiveness, and low malpractice area were important for 32, 19, and 18 percent of residents, respectively.

According to the report authors, residents "have a specific location in mind for their first practice option," and "this preference may override more practical considerations."

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Physician Compensation Up for Most Specialties

Posted on Sat, May 02, 2015
 Physician Compensation Up for Most Specialties

Top three earners for patient care are orthopedists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Physician compensation has gone up for almost all specialties, according to a 2015 report published by Medscape.

More than 19,500 physicians responded to the Medscape compensation survey and reported their compensation, practice changes resulting from health care reform, and adaptation to the new health care environment.

According to the report, the average compensation for specialists was $284,000, and for primary care physicians, the average compensation was $195,000, reflecting a modest upward trend. The top three earners in terms of compensation for patient care were orthopedists, cardiologists, and gastroenterologists, with pediatricians, family physicians, and endocrinologists and internists being the lowest earners. Orthopedists were also the top earners for non-patient care activities, including expert witness duties, product sales, speaking engagements, and other activities, followed by urologists, plastic surgeons, and dermatologists. The lowest earners in this category were radiologists, pediatricians, and anesthesiologists. Only rheumatologists reported a large decrease in income from the prior year (4 percent decrease); the only other specialists to see a decline were urologists (1 percent), while all other physicians reported an increase.

The highest earnings for this year were reported in the Northwest and South Central regions, with the lowest earnings in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. The top 10 earning states included North Dakota, Alaska, Wyoming, Wisconsin, and Oklahoma, while the District of Columbia, Rhode Island, Maryland, and New Mexico were included as the lowest earning states.

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