Menu

Blog Posts

hypertension

Hypertension-Linked ER Visits Common and Increasing

Posted on Sat, Nov 21, 2015
Hypertension-Linked ER Visits Common and Increasing

Estimated yearly incidence rate up by 5.2 percent per year from 2006 to 2012 for HTN-linked ER visits

Hypertension-related emergency department visits are relatively common and increased from 2006 to 2012, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Candace D. McNaughton M.D., M.P.H., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues examined the burden of hypertension-related emergency department visits, as well as the associated patient and hospital characteristics. Hypertension-related emergency department visits were identified using the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample from 2006 to 2012; population-based rates for each study year were determined by linking to U.S. Census Bureau July population estimates.

The researchers found that during the seven-year study period there were 165,946,807 hypertension-related emergency department visits (23.6 percent of all adult visits); hypertension was the primary diagnosis for 0.9 percent of all adult emergency department visits. Per year there was a 5.2 percent increase in the estimated yearly incidence rate for hypertension-related visits (P < 0.001) and a 4.4 percent increase per year for visits with a primary diagnosis of hypertension (P < 0.001). The proportion of adults hospitalized decreased over the same time period, and the proportion of visits at safety net hospitals and among uninsured patients increased.

"These data indicate that hypertension-related emergency department visits are common and increasing," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)



Copyright © 2015 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Share    

Race May Factor Into Higher Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Posted on Sun, Jul 26, 2015
Race May Factor Into Higher Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Higher rates seen in blacks versus whites; often at younger ages

(HealthDay News) -- Blacks are more likely than whites to experience sudden cardiac arrest and it often occurs at an earlier age in blacks than in whites, according to research published online July 20 in Circulation.

Sumeet Chugh, M.D., associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, and colleagues collected data on 1,262 whites and 126 blacks. They all had experienced sudden cardiac arrest between 2002 and 2012. While 33 percent of the whites in the study had diabetes, 52 percent of the blacks did. Hypertension was an issue for 77 percent of the blacks, compared to 65 percent of the whites. Chronic renal insufficiency was nearly twice as likely in blacks, with 34 percent of them having the condition, the researchers found.

Blacks in the United States tend to have sudden cardiac arrest an average of six years earlier than whites, Chugh told HealthDay. In his study, he found other major differences as well. "Blacks, in addition to being younger, tended to have more diabetes, more high blood pressure, and more kidney problems, or chronic renal disease," he said.

Chugh added that he isn't certain what's driving the differences in sudden cardiac arrest between blacks and whites. It's possible it might be genetics, cultural differences in lifestyle or other factors, he suggested. Inadequate health coverage may be another factor.

Abstract
Full Text



Copyright © 2015 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Share    

Cardiovascular, Cerebral Effect for Red Bull + Mental Stress

Posted on Mon, Feb 02, 2015
Cardiovascular, Cerebral Effect for Red Bull + Mental Stress

Increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, decreased cerebral blood flow velocity

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Red Bull consumption combined with mental stress correlates with increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Erik Konrad Grasser, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Fribourg in Switzerland, and colleagues examined the consequences of Red Bull ingestion in combination with mental stress. Twenty healthy participants ingested 355 ml Red Bull or water and underwent a mental arithmetic test for five minutes 80 minutes later.

FEATURED JOB: Emergency Medicine Physician in Houston, TX 

The researchers found that water had no significant effects, but Red Bull increased systolic and diastolic BP (+7 mm Hg and +4 mm Hg, respectively) and heart rate (+7 beats/min). There was a greater decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity with Red Bull versus water ingestion (−9 versus −3 cm/s; P < 0.005). There were further increases in systolic and diastolic BP (+3 mm Hg; P < 0.05) and heart rate (+13 beats/min; P < 0.005) with additional mental stress after ingestion of Red Bull; similar increases were also seen after ingestion of water. The combination of Red Bull and mental stress increased systolic and diastolic BP (about +10 mm Hg and +7 mm Hg, respectively) and heart rate (+20 beats/min), and decreased cerebral blood flow velocity (−7 cm/s).

FEATURED JOB: Pediatrician in Loxahatchee, FL

"The combination of Red Bull and mental stress impose a cumulative cardiovascular load and reduces cerebral blood flow even under a mental challenge," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text



 

Share