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Tips to Boost Your Documentation Process: Heart Failure

Posted on Wed, Feb 04, 2015
Tips to Boost Your Documentation Process: Heart Failure

By Timothy N. Brundage M.D., CCDs

Good documentation is important for new physicians as well as veteran caregivers. While documenting can seem like a very straightforward skill, there are often “best practices” that can be utilized. As a hospitalist for EmCare at St. Petersburg General Hospital in St. Petersburg, FL I write a “weekly documentation tip” email to help physicians improve their clinical documentation. I also share these documentation strategies with the residents I teach.   

Heart Failure
“Coding Clinic,” a published guideline for coders, determined that “Heart Failure with reduced Ejection Fraction” cannot be coded as “Systolic Heart Failure.” Also, “Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction” cannot be coded as “Diastolic Heart Failure.”

Physicians must, at some point in the chart, document “systolic” or “diastolic” to capture the specificity of the heart failure correctly. “Acute,” “chronic” or “acute on chronic” must also be documented.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Dr. Timothy Brundage is a hospitalist for EmCare at St. Petersburg General Hospital in St. Petersburg, FL. Dr. Brundage earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and molecular biology at the University of Michigan, his M.D. at the Wayne State University School of Medicine and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of South Florida College of Medicine. Subscribe to Dr. Brundage’s weekly documentation tips, or ask him about specific documentation issues, by emailing him at DrBrundage@gmail.com.

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Heart Failure Survival Up in Obese, Overweight Patients

Posted on Sun, Jan 11, 2015
Heart Failure Survival Up in Obese, Overweight Patients

'Paradoxical' finding suggests excess pounds are protective

TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Obese heart-failure patients appear to live longer than people of normal weight who develop the condition, a new study suggests. The report appears in the Dec. 30 issue of theJournal of the American College of Cardiology.

Anita Deswal, M.D., a professor of medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues collected data on 1,487 people with heart failure who took part in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, an ongoing study conducted in four U.S. communities. Among these patients, 35 percent were overweight and 47 percent were obese about four years before their diagnosis.

Over a decade of follow-up, 43 percent of the patients died. The researchers found that 38 percent of obese and 45 percent of overweight patients died over 10 years, compared with 51 percent of normal-weight patients. The difference held even if they also had other health issues such as diabetes or hypertension.

"At this time, the reasons for this beneficial association are not clear," Deswal toldHealthDay.

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